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  #1  
Old 07-30-2005, 02:31 PM
jeffwilkinson jeffwilkinson is offline
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Default Blocked shunt

Does anyone know the symptoms of a blocked shunt and when to seek emergency care. I have read the pamphlets that say such things as the original symptoms return, headache,*gait disturbance, etc., but I can't tell when I should go to the hospital and when I should ride it out. When I go to the hospital, half the time I'm ignored and the other half of the time I'm sent to Toronto and then left to find my own way home, 600 km. away. Any ideas?
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  #2  
Old 08-05-2005, 06:38 PM
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Default Blocked shunt

Signs of a malfunctioning shunt-fever, vomiting, headache, lethargy, irritability, seizures, vision problems, loss of coordination, swelling and/or redness along shunt tract, abdominal pain with VP shunts, loss of previous abilities such as sensory or motor skills.

*If shunt*malfunctions are not treated, major problems such as brain damage or blindness could occur.* In some instances, a blocked shunt that goes untreated even for a short period of time can be life threatening.

If you feel there is a problem with your shunt*and you have several of the signs of a shunt malfunction seek medical assistance as soon as possible.

Shauna

SB&H Information & Services Coordinator

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  #3  
Old 08-06-2005, 04:55 AM
jeffwilkinson jeffwilkinson is offline
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Default Blocked shunt

Shauna:

Thanks for the information. I think I have some serious trouble here, but don't know where to turn for help. My motor skills have been affected dramatically and I'm suffering seizures that resemble epilepsy. I have uncontrollable shaking, accompanied by headaches, nervousness, edema in the eyes and balance problems.

I went to the hospital. I thought I had suffered an epileptic seizure. They did an ECG, Echocardiogram, blood tests and then told me to go home. But I can't handle it here. I live alone. The doctor told me to increase my Clonazapam to four .5 mg. tablets a day, but I'm still getting seizures. He told me I didn't have to come back to the hospital unless my seizures caused me to lose consciousness. That hasn't happened.

But I'm scared and alone. And I don't know what to do with these drugs I don't understand. I take Oxycoten 60 mg. twice a day, Oxycocet (two or less a day as needed), Flomax (for prostate problems), Clonazapam (now four times a day) and Triazalam. And I'm juggling them without knowing what I'm doing. I need some help, but don't know*where to go. The hospital just sends me home.**

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  #4  
Old 08-08-2005, 12:30 AM
valerie valerie is offline
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Default Blocked shunt

Hi Jeff:

I can't offer any better advise than Shauna can on this matter but I will try to get in touch with a fellow I know who struggles with the problem of living a long way from*Toronto's hospitals and not feeling that he get adequate health care in his community.* Perhaps he will be able to offer some suggestions.*

Valerie

*

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  #5  
Old 08-08-2005, 04:48 PM
john bothwell john bothwell is offline
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Default Blocked shunt

Hi Jeff,<br> <br> I live in Sault Ste Marie and yes it is difficult to get the help you need. Can I have your telephone number so we can talk about your situation.<br> <br> John Bothwell
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  #6  
Old 12-26-2009, 12:04 PM
raisacombs
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Default Blocked shunt

a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is surgery that is done to relieve pressure inside the skull (intracranial pressure). This pressure is caused by too much cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on the brain (hydrocephalus). The fluid is drawn off (shunted) from the ventricles in the brain into the abdominal (peritoneal) cavity.
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  #7  
Old 02-28-2010, 04:39 AM
chisgale
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Default Brand New Acai

what are the signs and symptoms of a shunt malfunction?
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  #8  
Old 03-17-2010, 11:34 AM
Anscom
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Default

We seem to be getting a lot of enquiries re people who have discovered they have occulta. Is this the case for you* and how can they be helped.
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  #9  
Old 05-26-2010, 03:00 PM
infolady infolady is offline
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Default shunt malfunction signs

Shunts can stop working or malfunction. A shunt that stops working causes the same symptoms as untreated hydrocephalus. The consequences of shunt malfunction vary greatly. In some cases, the shunt may totally cease to function without any adverse consequences or it may malfunction only occassionally, causing the individual few ill effects. However, quite often there are moderate to severe reactions, typical of excessive pressure in the brain.

Signs of shunt malfunction occur when there is a shunt blockage or infection.

Obstruction will produce signs and symptoms of increased pressure in the head. Partial obstruction may result in periodic headaches, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, listlessness and decreased mental function.

Infection usually results from bacteria found normally on the skin and occurs in 8-12% of all shunt surgeries. Infections may occur as long as six months after surgery. Shunt infections can be life threatening and must be treated immediately to reduce the risk of brain damage or death.

Symptoms of a proximal catheter-end infection may include headache, fever, swelling or redness along the shunt tract, irritability, meningitis and a stiff neck.

Symptoms of a peritoneal cahteter-end infection may include mild to moderate abdominal pain, fever, change in bowel habits, listlessness and abdominal swelling.

Shunt infections are generally treated in four steps-surgery to remove the infected shunt system; placement of a temporary external shunt system; antibiotics; surgical placement of a new shunt system.

Individuals and families must be alert for signs and symptoms resulting from shunt complications. Early detection prevents emergency situations.
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  #10  
Old 10-30-2010, 03:16 AM
kornfluker kornfluker is offline
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Default hmmm?

do you not have any family you can contact to help? and get them to take you to a better hospital?
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