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Old 07-12-2014, 06:36 PM
Profit5500 Profit5500 is offline
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Default What families are at risk for having a child with Spina Bifida

There are numerous cases of Spina Bifida which occurs sadly occurs with families. The affect of Spina Bifida is a tragic one, which I know those people who have it are the ones who suffer. I mean his or her spinal column is deformed and not to mention be impaired with learning disabilities. What families are at risk for Spina Bifida? Is it families with heart trouble and obesity?
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  #2  
Old 07-17-2014, 07:57 AM
elmarianexx elmarianexx is offline
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Who is at risk for having a baby with Spina Bifida?
Any woman who is capable of becoming pregnant can have a baby with Spina Bifida. There are approximately 65 million women of childbearing age in the United States. Although people with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling) with Spina Bifida are 5 to 10 times more likely to have Spina Bifida than the greater population, there is no way to tell which women will have babies with Spina Bifida. Ninety-five percent of people with SB have no family history. Many things affect pregnancy, including genes, environment and certain illnesses or drugs. These include:

Prior pregnancy with Spina Bifida (the chance of the next pregnancy being affected is 20-50 times greater)
Family history of SB
Mother with insulin-dependent diabetes
Motherís use of certain anti-seizure drugs
Mother with medically diagnosed obesity
Race and ethnicity. (SB is more common in Caucasians than African-Americans and more common in Hispanics than non-Hispanics.)
Other things may raise the chance of having a baby with Spina Bifida, but they are not as well understood. These things include:

Exposure to high temperatures in early pregnancy, such as prolonged high fevers
Extended hot tub or sauna use
Parental exposure to Agent Orange.

More information at this article:
http://www.spinabifidaassociation.or...ina_Bifida.htm
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  #3  
Old 08-27-2014, 06:58 AM
Profit5500 Profit5500 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elmarianexx View Post
Who is at risk for having a baby with Spina Bifida?
Any woman who is capable of becoming pregnant can have a baby with Spina Bifida. There are approximately 65 million women of childbearing age in the United States. Although people with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling) with Spina Bifida are 5 to 10 times more likely to have Spina Bifida than the greater population, there is no way to tell which women will have babies with Spina Bifida. Ninety-five percent of people with SB have no family history. Many things affect pregnancy, including genes, environment and certain illnesses or drugs. These include:

Prior pregnancy with Spina Bifida (the chance of the next pregnancy being affected is 20-50 times greater)
Family history of SB
Mother with insulin-dependent diabetes
Motherís use of certain anti-seizure drugs
Mother with medically diagnosed obesity
Race and ethnicity. (SB is more common in Caucasians than African-Americans and more common in Hispanics than non-Hispanics.)
Other things may raise the chance of having a baby with Spina Bifida, but they are not as well understood. These things include:

Exposure to high temperatures in early pregnancy, such as prolonged high fevers
Extended hot tub or sauna use
Parental exposure to Agent Orange.

More information at this article:
http://www.spinabifidaassociation.or...ina_Bifida.htm
All this info is really helpful it is imperative for women who are pregnant to not lose their intake on foods with folic acid. I am not sure if the Nature Made bottle of pills that have folic acid would be any help to pregnant women. That is odd that SB is more common in Caucasians and Hispanics which I thought all of the races had equal chances in getting a child born with SB if there is a lack of folic acid.
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Old 09-01-2014, 12:47 PM
GemmaRowlands GemmaRowlands is offline
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You should always take a close look at your family history when you are planning a baby, not just for SB but for a lot of other things as well, that you wouldn't want to be surprised with after your child is born. Folic acid is INCREDIBLY important, because it can help to reduce the chances that your baby will have SB. Even with a family history, you often find that the mother of the child who has it did not take supplements, so you could arguably blame that rather than the history itself. The best thing to do is to discuss it with your doctor, and s/he will then talk you through your risks. It is then of course entirely up to you whether you choose to go ahead, knowing what could potentially happen.
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  #5  
Old 09-13-2014, 12:05 AM
atuckerit atuckerit is offline
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Default brain/spine/body abnormalities not specific to anyone

I have learned a significant amount in the past 6 months due to having a severely abnormal child.

I have 3 normal children.
I take care of myself and take vitamins.
5 months into the pregnancy with my 4th (my only son), I blew up like a balloon (polyhydramnios).
My body knew something was wrong with the baby and tried to spontaneously abort him with a placental abruption at 30 weeks.

When speaking with geneticists, there are TONS of genetic abnormalities, mutations, and anomalies that have NO risk factors and suddenly show up out of nowhere. Every time you have a child, you are risking that the baby may be abnormal.

In our case, our CVS came back normal. Normal ultrasounds. At 30 weeks, we suddenly have a premature NICU infant with severely deformed brain. He caught viral meningitis after being discharged from the NICU from a common enterovirus (respiratory/digestive bug that occurs in summer). Caused even more brain damage.

Having kids is a risk, period. I have 3 perfect children and 1 with many, many health issues.
There are syndromes out there that most parents never heard of (like Williams Syndrome or Soto Syndrome).
Stuff you hope your child never has to deal with, but it does hit some of us unexpectedly.

Thanks for listening.
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Old 09-15-2014, 10:48 PM
joshua minaya joshua minaya is offline
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when considering this rare disease certainly one needs to make sure that they are well aware of the possible causes of this ailment and if possible help to detect the symptoms of this ailment . I believe early detection will go a long way i helping the pstient
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  #7  
Old 10-10-2014, 04:52 PM
Determined2014 Determined2014 is offline
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[QUOTE=elmarianexx;25502]Who is at risk for having a baby with Spina Bifida?
Any woman who is capable of becoming pregnant can have a baby with Spina Bifida. There are approximately 65 million women of childbearing age in the United States. Although people with a first-degree relative (parent, sibling) with Spina Bifida are 5 to 10 times more likely to have Spina Bifida than the greater population, there is no way to tell which women will have babies with Spina Bifida. Ninety-five percent of people with SB have no family history. Many things affect pregnancy, including genes, environment and certain illnesses or drugs. These include:

Prior pregnancy with Spina Bifida (the chance of the next pregnancy being affected is 20-50 times greater)
Family history of SB
Mother with insulin-dependent diabetes
Motherís use of certain anti-seizure drugs
Mother with medically diagnosed obesity
Race and ethnicity. (SB is more common in Caucasians than African-Americans and more common in Hispanics than non-Hispanics.)
Other things may raise the chance of having a baby with Spina Bifida, but they are not as well understood. These things include:

Exposure to high temperatures in early pregnancy, such as prolonged high fevers
Extended hot tub or sauna use
Parental exposure to Agent Orange.
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